Jul 08

Local Girl Scouts Learn How to Create Video Games (New York 1)

More than two dozen teenage Girl Scouts are taking part in a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, or STEM, program at the New York Hall of Science this week, where they're learning how to make programming codes and use special software to create 3-D video games as part of the Girl Scout Leadership Institute.

Cable news channel NY1 recently ran a story about this new initiative.  To view the clip, click HERE.  (A Time Warner Cable account is required, so if you're unable to view it, please scroll down for a transcript.)



Erin Keplish: “My avatar has blue spiky hair that is probably a foot tall.”

NY1: Erin Keplish says nothing is too outrageous in the virtual video gaming world she’s creating.

Erin Keplish: “Well, right now, I just built a volcano thing that it’s going to live in, and it also has a house, and I’m making a pool.”

NY1: She’s one of two dozen teenage Girl Scouts taking part in a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, or STEM program, at the New York Hall of Science.  The girls are learning how to make programming codes, and use special software to create 3-D video games.

Calista Lee:  “I just feel like it’s a great opportunity to not just pursue my passions, but to meet fellow peers and sisters that have the same passion as I do.”

Tatiana Bracht: “I hope to build a nice little abstract house because I want to prove to myself that I can be in that little field of computer technology.”

NY1:  The workshop is part of the Girl Scout Leadership Institute, which aims to give Girl Scouts real-world entrepreneurial and leadership experience.  Organizers say the four-day workshop gives girls a safe and supportive environment where the girls can learn.

Karen Lundgard: “They get to work with other girls.  They don’t have that intimidation of working with other boys or men in their classrooms.”

NY1: And Lundgard says it’s important to introduce girls to STEM programs at an early age.

Karen Lundgard: “We found that if girls aren’t getting that experience at an early age, they’re being intimidated by it.

NY1: Keplish says there’s nothing to be intimidated about.  She hopes more girls look into STEM careers.

Erin Keplish: “Instead of women having these pre-conceived ideas about what they’re supposed to do, I think that STEM is just a great place for them to be because it’s innovative.”

 

 

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